Comments on: Nick Pollard on the place of worldview in postmodern apologetics http://www.evangelicalresources.org/blog/?p=69 Evangelical Resources for the 21st Century Mon, 23 Apr 2018 17:15:15 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.0 by: Heather http://www.evangelicalresources.org/blog/?p=69#comment-854 Wed, 16 Aug 2006 17:17:50 +0000 http://www.evangelicalresources.org/blog/?p=69#comment-854 By the way, I posted my thoughts on aesthetics today that you were wondering about. I don't know if it will help you understand where I'm coming from or not. By the way, I posted my thoughts on aesthetics today that you were wondering about. I don’t know if it will help you understand where I’m coming from or not.

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by: Heather http://www.evangelicalresources.org/blog/?p=69#comment-821 Tue, 15 Aug 2006 15:14:33 +0000 http://www.evangelicalresources.org/blog/?p=69#comment-821 I absolutely agree with the last paragraph of your quote in that any missions course/program/evaluation in a new area includes an analysis of communication (language, style, nonverbal aspects, etc). If postmoderns value story over propositional, than the best way to communicate is story (which, as the quote pointed out, is how Jesus communicated, making it ironic that you feel that this "subjective" way of communicating is dehumanizing). I also fully agree with the area of questioning. There is a lot of questioning going on as to what is real and what isn't real. This is an exciting opportunity for Christians to stand in and minister and participate and evaluate. However, I believe the assessment that postmoderns don't think is grossly misrepresented. Pomos may not think in the way determined by the Enlightenment as the appropriate and only way to think (hence seeing all non-Western cultures as idiots and barbaric), but we think. Ergo, the questioning and the literary bent. I also don't agree that the idea of worldview is out the window. In fact, I believe the opposite. Pomos are looking at the world and recognizing cultural lenses, how this affects our everyday life, our beliefs, our interpretation and practice of Christianity (for those of us that are Christians). Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you mean by the term "worldview." I absolutely agree with the last paragraph of your quote in that any missions course/program/evaluation in a new area includes an analysis of communication (language, style, nonverbal aspects, etc). If postmoderns value story over propositional, than the best way to communicate is story (which, as the quote pointed out, is how Jesus communicated, making it ironic that you feel that this “subjective” way of communicating is dehumanizing). I also fully agree with the area of questioning. There is a lot of questioning going on as to what is real and what isn’t real. This is an exciting opportunity for Christians to stand in and minister and participate and evaluate.
However, I believe the assessment that postmoderns don’t think is grossly misrepresented. Pomos may not think in the way determined by the Enlightenment as the appropriate and only way to think (hence seeing all non-Western cultures as idiots and barbaric), but we think. Ergo, the questioning and the literary bent.
I also don’t agree that the idea of worldview is out the window. In fact, I believe the opposite. Pomos are looking at the world and recognizing cultural lenses, how this affects our everyday life, our beliefs, our interpretation and practice of Christianity (for those of us that are Christians). Maybe I’m misunderstanding what you mean by the term “worldview.”

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